Paolo Maldini: Crown Prince of Milan

Aug 22, 2020

Life Stories

Paolo Maldini

Beginnings

Paolo Maldini was born in Milan in 1968. His father, Cesare, won many titles as a player with AC Milan and was a successful coach, both at club level and with Italy. Paolo started his youth football with Milan, made the first team by the age of 16; and never went anywhere else. He won his first league title in 1988, still only 19; in the same year he got the first of his 126 caps for Italy.

Il Capitano

Paolo Maldini played as a cool, elegant defender, mostly at left back. He led his team-mates at Milan and in the national team. He stayed with Milan for 25 seasons, winning 25 trophies. He played 14 years for Italy, eight years as captain, and was involved in four World Cups. In 2007, aged 39, he was named Best Defender by UEFA. He retired as a player in 2009.

The Maldini Dynasty?

After retiring from playing football, Maldini started his own fashion label. In 2019, Milan made him technical director. He almost joined Chelsea as a coach in 2012, but the pull of Milan was too strong. Maldini’s No 3 shirt was “retired” in 2009, but Paolo has two sons, both footballers with Milan; if either of them makes the First XI he will be given Paolo’s shirt number.

Thinking points

Paolo Maldini’s career seems too good to be true. Following in his father’s footsteps, Paolo played 25 seasons at AC Milan, won 25 trophies, played 126 times for Italy and was still regarded as Best Defender in the World when he was 40. He has two sons hoping to continue the “Maldini Dynasty”.

Educators could look at the life story of Paolo Maldini and work with young people to consider these questions:

  1. In an age of football transfers driving internationalisation of teams, how come some high-level players, like Maldini, choose to stay in their hometown?
  2. Is Football a game handed down from parent-to-child?

Find out more

Find out more about Maldini the father and son and their football careers on These Football Times.

COVER Image

Paolo Maldini, AC Milan 1996/97 (Source: UEFA Champions League, #FlashbackFriday Tweet. May 19, 2017)

Paolo Maldini, AC Milan 1996/97 (Source: UEFA Champions League, #FlashbackFriday Tweet. May 19, 2017).

Life Story

Paolo Maldini’s career seems too good to be true, stylish on and off the field, his life has never been touched by failure or scandal.

62

Article Tags:   identity  |   local history

LIFE STORIES  To discover now

Do you wanna know more?

HISTORY CAN BE EXPLORED THROUGH THE LIVES OF INDIVIDUALS

Stories

Browse our collection of stories about football history and inclusion. With the history of football being made up of millions of stories, of individuals and communities, of movements and processes, we offer stories that can inspire our cultural conversations today.

Videos

Get to know untold stories where individuals are making history with football. When faced with insurmountable challenges, individuals past and present can use football as a cultural force to foster positive change in society. We honour these individuals and tell their ‘untold’ stories in short videos.

Educational Resources

Explore our innovative educational resources that use football’s history, heritage and legacy to engage young people. The resources include ready-made lesson plans and historical source collections for school history education as well as toolkit with activities for non-formal settings.

Trending Stories

Refugees

Refugees

In the wake of the 2015 migration peak, activists and volunteers across Europe have been involved in supporting refugees, sometimes with the simple act of offering space and friendship to participate in football through grassroots clubs to help newcomers integrate.

LATEST POST  You may also be interested in

Only girl on the field

Only girl on the field

This article is the result of a webinar series from EuroClio which tackled football and social issues to explore how football history and society intertwine.

Match of Inhumanity

Match of Inhumanity

Today in 1944 football was played in the concentration camp Tezerin. What does this propaganda footage tell us about the Holocaust?

Share This